Thought for the…

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Being Spiritual Means Rejecting Bullshit!

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THERE ARE TWO DIFFERENT KINDS OF “CONVERSION” in the world of religion and spirituality. One takes place at the superficial level of the emotions and subconscious and is more religious in nature, bringing about some changes in outward behaviour and attitude. We see this in churches and temples the world over. The other kind of “conversion” takes place at the profoundest level possible in the human psyche and is totally transformative on the deepest psychospiritual levels, revolutionising the mind and life entirely and taking one down roads never dreamed of before. The first type of conversion is a cheap imitation and counterfeit of the second. Although there are superficial similarities, religion and spirituality are as different as chalk and cheese. Religion is about the accrual of intellectual theological knowledge at the expense of the power of spirit. Spirituality is about the eschewal of mere intellectual knowledge leading Read the rest of this entry »

Mahler’s Crazy Rondo Burleske

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I KNOW MOST OF YOU PROBABLY DO NOT HAVE THE TIME to listen to a complete Mahler symphony (lasting between 1 and 1½ hours!). You are far too busy and important people to be wasting your life infusing yourselves with divine musical nectar from one of the most deep and spiritual composers to have graced this planet. 😉 But could I tempt you to set aside your super-busy-ness to spend just 12 minutes of your life listening to one little part of his 9th Symphony? Actually, this particular part (or “movement” as it’s called) is especially relevant to “super-busy-ness”. Shockingly so. Let me explain: Read the rest of this entry »

I’m an Irredeemable Dissident!

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“You should stick to making music and poetry instead of writing your long political articles with an axe to grind”. So wrote someone to me recently. Here’s my answer: “I never cease to be amazed by the number of people who say this to me. Ironically, liberal types are especially good at trying to suppress the freethinking thoughts and writings of others who shake their tree and rattle their cage. Mind you, conservatives are getting pretty good at it too — especially those who are insanely enslaved to government lies and engage in the cult of the personality (e.g. worship Donald Trump!). So here’s the bottom-line: I will never allow control-freaks to dictate what I can and cannot write or sing. No one can dictate to me what I should do, simply because they find my artistry Read the rest of this entry »

A Strictly 3-D Craze

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When boundless love cannot be full expressed
through hands and words and gestures of the heart —
when skin and soul aren’t there to be caressed —
a vacuum grows, and life is lived apart.

To question why one should be in this state,
enrobed in flesh and orphaned without source,
will yield some startling answers arrowed straight
between your eyes to hit you with full force.

Exploding loveness then goes absolute
in longingful magnetic mindly ways.
For skin is always just a substitute —
a second-best and strictly 3-D craze.

Such yearning fosters grief and loss in some.
But on my knees to God with tears I come.

 

© Alan Morrison, 2018

 

April Fools’ Day is Every Day!

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NO NEED TO PUT AN APRIL FOOLS JOKE HERE. Just watch the news or read a newspaper (which is 90% propaganda or disinformation), or go on Facebook (where 90% of news stories, memes and claims are false, which is why it’s called “Fakebook”!). Almost everything in this world is fake — whether socially, emotionally or spiritually. April Fools Day is every day. Discovering the authentic is where it’s at. One can chuckle knowingly at the fakery but find joy in what is real. That is our life’s work: Exposing the bullshit and discovering what is authentic, both inwardly and outwardly. Now there’s a challenge! Happy April Fools Day!   

Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony

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RESURRECTION IS MORE THAN A RITE OF SPRING: It is the profound desire of every honest heart. The cycle of physical death can only be broken by resurrection. Resurrection is not to be confused with rebirth (which is merely another opportunity to die). Resurrection means the end of death and the beginning of true life, eternal life (which cannot be obtained in this dimension of physicality). The music of Resurrection is immortalised in the 2nd Symphony of Gustav Mahler (called “The Resurrection Symphony”), which he began writing at age 28 in 1888. At around an hour and a half long, it is a massive work with a huge orchestra, two female soloists and a vast choir (which appears in the finale). To listen to this work is akin to watching an unforgettable epic film. It is easy to see why it was voted the fifth-greatest symphony of all time in a survey of conductors carried out by the BBC Music Magazine. To listen to it in its entirety is like taking a journey from a funeral into heaven and beyond. Angels defeat demons in this score with the greatest cosmic drama you can imagine, complete with huge climaxes, off-stage instrument ensembles and theatrical music canvases. Really, you have to hear it to believe it. No description of mine can adequately convey its power, might and majesty. Honestly, I can guarantee that it will blow your mind and fill you with inspiration and ecstatic joy (if you stick with it to the end). And surely Resurrection is especially appropriate in this season?

This was the first Mahler symphony I ever heard at the back end of the 1970s and I was hooked from then on. What a baptism it was! Its music regularly pops into my mind unexpectedly, like coming round the corner in a forest to find a dell of budding bluebells in a shaft of sunlight.

Here the symphony is played in a 27-year old performance by the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra conducted by Simon Rattle in Birmingham Symphony Hall. (That’s Birmingham, UK, not Alabama! 🙂). Although this is an older performance (which was recorded for BBC Radio 3), I have deliberately chosen it as it is from the days when Mahler was played WITH FIRE! It is a fine recording and Simon Rattle conducts with such presence too. His pre-performance meditation is a necessity. (Plus, the commentator’s concluding comments are from the days when announcers could speak English properly and reverently 😉).

I cannot urge you enough to listen to this extraordinary music. After listening once more, I am sitting here like an explorer who has climbed the highest mountain and, exhausted, grasps the heavenly summit in gratitude, for that is where I wish to stay. If this gargantuan symphony speaks to you, you will be pinned to your seat mesmerised by its spiritual power and glory.